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UML Diagrams
Zicomi Systems publishes some UML example diagrams online from the world famous UML dictionary.
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Version 2.5 Released
Zicomi Systems is delighted to announce that version 2.5 of Zicomi Mentor is released. With support for UML 2.0 and all thirteen UML diagrams
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Zicomi Systems' Director
speaks about the UML at Objects by Design - an informative interview
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Partner Programme
Zicom Systems is delighted to announce a new world wide partner programme, become a partner today.
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OMG Member
Zicom Systems is made a member of the OMG!
UML Element Description
Join (Horizontal)
Join (Horizontal)    
A join can be orientated horizontally or vertically. Both orientations have exactly the same semantics; the difference is simply that when transitions are parallel to the x-axis a vertically orientated join is required whereas when transitions are parallel to the y-axis a horizontally orientated join is required.
Join (Vertical)
Join (Vertical)    
A join is a kind of pseudostate that re-unites two or more incoming transitions. All of the incoming transitions must have fired before the outgoing transition will fire.
Join Node
Join Node    
A join node is a type of control node that synchronizes a number of incoming flows into a single outgoing flow. Each (and every) incoming control flow must present a control token to the join node before the node can offer a single token to the outgoing flow. If some of the incoming flows are object flows, which carry object (data) tokens, these tokens are all offered to the outgoing flow. A join specification (for complete activities) may be used, which further governs the way that the join will evaluate the arrival of tokens.
Join Node
Join Node    
A join node can be orientated horizontally or vertically. Both orientations have exactly the same semantics; the difference is simply that when flows are parallel to the x-axis a vertically orientated join node is required, whereas when flows are parallel to the y-axis a horizontally orientated join node is required.
Junction
Junction    
A junction is a kind of pseudostate that is used to merge and (or) split one or more transitions between states creating complex paths. They can take one or more incoming transitions and have one or more outgoing transitions. The do not create concurrent transitions but their result is the firing of a single outgoing transition. The outgoing transitions are typically guarded and these conditions are evaluated statically.
Lifeline
Lifeline    
A lifeline represents the lifetime or existence of the participant located at the head of the dashed line. Regardless of whether a participant has an execution occurrence, if it has a lifeline then it has been created. Where the lifeline "disappears" beneath the execution occurrence it is assumed to continue to exist. If the participant is created or destroyed during the period of time represented by the diagram the lifeline will start or stop at the designated points.
Lifeline
Lifeline    
A lifeline (structural) is a visual synonym of a lifeline. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an alternative presentation of the lifeline element adapted for use on a communication diagram. In this form of the lifeline the instance is represented by the shape of the classifier, which may be a class, component, actor, use case or any other classifier. The lifeline does not have a dashed line like a sequence diagram, as time is not represented by any axis on a communication diagram. There is no standard form of this element as it has different presentations in the three different types of interaction diagrams and has two different presentations on a timing diagram.
Lifeline (Actor Instance)
Lifeline (Actor Instance)    
A lifeline represents the lifetime or existence of the participant named at the head of the dashed line. Regardless of whether a participant has an execution occurrence, if it has a lifeline then it has been created. The notation of the head of a lifeline changes depending on what type of element it represents. In this form the lifeline represents an actor instance or an actor playing a role with respect to the interaction.
Lifeline (Class Instance)
Lifeline (Class Instance)    
A lifeline represents the lifetime or existence of the participant located at the head of the dashed line. Regardless of whether a participant has an execution occurrence, if it has a lifeline then it has been created. Where the lifeline "disappears" beneath the execution occurrence it is assumed to continue to exist. If the participant is created or destroyed during the period of time represented by the diagram the lifeline will start or stop at the designated points.
Lifeline (State)
Lifeline (State)    
A lifeline (State) is a visual synonym of a lifeline. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an alternative presentation of the element adapted for use on a timing diagram. In this form of the lifeline states are listed on the vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis. A continuous line represents the state of the instance at any point in time. There is no standard form of this element as it has different presentations in the three different types of interaction diagrams and has two different presentations on the timing diagram.
Lifeline (Value)
Lifeline (Value)    
A lifeline (Value) is a visual synonym of a lifeline. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an alternative presentation of the lifeline element adapted for use on a timing diagram. In this form of the lifeline the instance is represented by two parallel lines that expand and contract, converging at a point, before diverging again. The point of convergence marks an event occurrence where an event changes the lifeline in some way giving the element its characteristic concertina (or sausage) appearance. Time is represented on the horizontal axis. Two contiguous and parallel lines represent the state of the instance at any point in time. There is no standard form of this element as it has different presentations in the three different types of interaction diagrams and has two different presentations on the timing diagram.
Link
Link    
A link is an instance of an association. While an association connects classifiers to show structural relationships, the link (association instance) connects classifier instances. It is a list of the references between classifier instances. Its most common expression is a reference to two classifier instances in its binary form: an n-ary association will have n-ary links. Properties such as aggregation can be used with a link, however multiplicity and ordering may not as they have no meaning.
Loop (Combined Fragment)
Loop (Combined Fragment)    
A loop interaction operator (signified by the value of loop) defines a combined fragment where the messages contained in the fragment are repeated a number of times. The guard contains a lower bound defining the minimum number of times the operand must loop, an upper bound defining the maximum number of times the operand will be executed and a boolean expression (evaluated after the operand has looped the minimum number of times) which if false will terminate the loop.
Lost Message
Lost Message    
A lost message is a kind of message where the sender (event occurrence) is known but the receiver (event occurrence) is not known. It is assumed that the reason it does not have a receiver (reception) is because it never reached its destination.
Unified Modeling Language and UML are either registered

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