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UML Diagrams
Zicomi Systems publishes some UML example diagrams online from the world famous UML dictionary.
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Version 2.5 Released
Zicomi Systems is delighted to announce that version 2.5 of Zicomi Mentor is released. With support for UML 2.0 and all thirteen UML diagrams
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Zicomi Systems' Director
speaks about the UML at Objects by Design - an informative interview
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Partner Programme
Zicom Systems is delighted to announce a new world wide partner programme, become a partner today.
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OMG Member
Zicom Systems is made a member of the OMG!
UML Element Description
Lifeline (State)
Lifeline (State)    
A lifeline (State) is a visual synonym of a lifeline. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an alternative presentation of the element adapted for use on a timing diagram. In this form of the lifeline states are listed on the vertical axis and time on the horizontal axis. A continuous line represents the state of the instance at any point in time. There is no standard form of this element as it has different presentations in the three different types of interaction diagrams and has two different presentations on the timing diagram.
Lifeline (Value)
Lifeline (Value)    
A lifeline (Value) is a visual synonym of a lifeline. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an alternative presentation of the lifeline element adapted for use on a timing diagram. In this form of the lifeline the instance is represented by two parallel lines that expand and contract, converging at a point, before diverging again. The point of convergence marks an event occurrence where an event changes the lifeline in some way giving the element its characteristic concertina (or sausage) appearance. Time is represented on the horizontal axis. Two contiguous and parallel lines represent the state of the instance at any point in time. There is no standard form of this element as it has different presentations in the three different types of interaction diagrams and has two different presentations on the timing diagram.
Synchronous Message (State)
Synchronous Message (State)    
A synchronous message (state) is a visual synonym of a synchronous message. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an example of the synchronous message adapted for use on a timing diagram. This usage of the synchronous message has the same form as a synchronous message used on other interaction diagrams: a solid line with a solid arrowhead directed from one lifeline to another (possibly reflexive). It is listed separately because the message ends give it a different appearance from other examples. The points on the execution occurrence, where the synchronous messages end, represent event occurrences and are important events in a lifeline. There is a single form of presentation in the three different types of interaction diagrams and the two different presentations of the timing diagram.
Synchronous Message (Value)
Synchronous Message (Value)    
A synchronous message (value) is a visual synonym of a synchronous message. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an example of the synchronous message adapted for use on a timing diagram. This usage of the synchronous message has the same form as a synchronous message used on other interaction diagrams: a solid line with a solid arrowhead directed from one lifeline to another (possibly reflexive). It is listed separately because the message ends give it a different appearance from other examples. The points on the execution occurrence, where the synchronous messages end, represent event occurrences and are important events in a lifeline. There is a single form of presentation in the three different types of interaction diagrams and the two different presentations of the timing diagram.
Reply Message (State)
Reply Message (State)    
A reply message (state) is a visual synonym of a reply message. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an example of the reply message adapted for use on a timing diagram. This usage of the reply message has the same form as a reply message used on other interaction diagrams: a dashed line with an open arrowhead directed from one execution occurrence to another (possibly reflexive). It is listed separately because the message ends give it a different appearance from other examples. The reply represents an explicit representation of a return from a synchronous message. There is a single form of presentation in the three different types of interaction diagrams and the two different presentations of the timing diagram.
Reply Message (Value)
Reply Message (Value)    
A reply message (value) is a visual synonym of a reply message. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an example of the reply message adapted for use on a timing diagram. This usage of the reply message has the same form as a reply message used on other interaction diagrams: a dashed line with an open arrowhead directed from one execution occurrence to another (possibly reflexive). It is listed separately because the message ends give it a different appearance from other examples. The reply represents an explicit representation of a return from a synchronous message. There is a single form of presentation in the three different types of interaction diagrams and the two different presentations of the timing diagram.
Asynchronous Message (State)
Asynchronous Message (State)    
An asynchronous message (state) is a visual synonym of an asynchronous message. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an example of the asynchronous message adapted for use on a timing diagram. This usage of the asynchronous message has the same form as an asynchronous message used on other interaction diagrams: a solid line with an open arrowhead directed from one execution occurrence to another (possibly reflexive). It is listed separately because the message ends give it a different appearance from other examples. The points on the execution occurrence where the asynchronous messages end represent event occurrences and are important events in a lifeline. There is a single form of presentation in the three different types of interaction diagrams and the two different presentations of the timing diagram.
Asynchronous Message (Value)
Asynchronous Message (Value)    
An asynchronous message (value) is a visual synonym of a message. It adds no additional semantics; it is simply an example of the asynchronous message adapted for use on a timing diagram. This usage of the asynchronous message has the same form as an asynchronous message used on other interaction diagrams: a solid line with an open arrowhead directed from one lifeline to another (possibly reflexive). It is listed separately because the message ends give it a different appearance from other examples. The point on the execution occurrence where the asynchronous messages end represent event occurrences and are important events in a lifeline. There is a single form of presentation in the three different types of interaction diagrams and the two different presentations of the timing diagram.
Timing Ruler
Timing Ruler    
A timing ruler is a graduated device for indicating the passage of time on a timing diagram. The graduations are called ticks and are typically placed on the lower edge of the diagram frame. Time runs from left to right. The scale and time units (ticks) depend upon what the diagram represents and may be sub-second units such as milliseconds or larger time divisions such as hours, days, months or even years.
Time Constraint
Time Constraint    
A time constraint is a type of interval constraint that specifies that one or more model elements must conform to a restriction specified by a time interval. A time constraint is not the time interval itself but a constraint, which associates the interval with one or more elements specifying how it restricts the elements, time semantics.
Duration Constraint
Duration Constraint    
A duration constraint is a type of interval constraint that specifies that one or more model elements must conform to a restriction specified by a duration interval. A duration constraint is not the duration interval itself but a constraint, which associates the interval with one or more elements, specifying how the interval restricts the duration semantics of the element(s).
Event Occurrence (General Value)
Event Occurrence (General Value)    
An event occurrence is both a type of interaction fragment and a type of message end. Event occurrences mark the points on a lifeline where events occur. An event occurrence is the basic unit of meaning in an interaction. A lifeline is used to describe the way an instance, or a classifier playing a role, changes over time and event occurrences mark the points on lifelines where messages start or end.
Comment (Note)
Comment (Note)    
A comment can contain textual information or graphical symbols that add additional information to a diagram or model. The information can take many forms from very formal, in the case of constraints, to conversational, in the case of working notes. Comments can be placed anywhere in a model or diagram, and simply by their proximity and alignment; they can be applicable to one or more elements. They may also be attached either to one or more elements by a comment attaching line.
Comment (Note) Attaching Line
Comment (Note) Attaching Line    
A comment attaching line is a dashed line that is used to attach a comment (note) to a model element in a diagram. The comment (note) attaching line is not a UML relationship and has no semantics beyond signifying that the contents of a comment apply to the model element it is attached to. A comment may be attached to any number of model elements or may exist in isolation and by placement in proximity to one or more model elements signify that it applies to those elements.
Unified Modeling Language and UML are either registered

trademarks or trademarks of Object Management Group, Inc. in the

United States and/or other countries.